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How To Avoid The Pain Of The Surgical Procedure

When someone loses a member of their family in an accident, there is an immediate emotional bond that will be there. I often have clients who ask why they are so traumatized after a surgical procedure, and I think the answers could be more than one. One thing I have noticed is that people sometimes want to go through recovery as quickly and painlessly as possible so they avoid having people ask questions about the experience.

In the surgical field (like the one I work in), this is a procedure known as a craniotomy . This is a simple procedure used to open a small section of skull, and then extract brain tissue for study. To some, however, this is a complicated, traumatic and painful procedure that they simply don’t want to have to go through again.

This leaves many with an emotional need to not be bothered with the details of the procedure in the future. They want to avoid having to talk about it, which is perfectly understandable. However, if one is going through recovery from surgery for a significant amount of time, this emotional need may be much more debilitating and cause further distress.

To avoid this, the best thing one can do is to learn how to cope and deal with the aftermath without giving an emotional investment to the procedure in the future. This can be a daunting task for most individuals, but once they begin to deal with the emotions, it is a natural progression. At our institution, we have staff who have spent years of training preparing us to deal with these situations, but we have also created a separate mental recovery room just for this purpose. It has been well received by clients, and the staff is very proud to be providing these services to our clients.

Here are some thoughts I share with my clients when they ask me why I spend time explaining the pain of the procedure:

Don’t feel guilty. It is your body and your experience. There is no reason to have a negative emotion, and I understand why people don’t want to feel the whole story of their recovery.

It is your body and your experience. There is no reason to have a negative emotion, and I understand why people don’t want to feel the whole story of their recovery. Accept and honor your trauma and healing.

It is not your body that is experiencing physical pain with the craniotomy, it is your soul. It is the pain of knowing you have lost your precious loved one, who is still alive as you walk to the hospital and sit in what will most likely be the last hospital bed in your life. In some ways, the feeling of knowing that you have lost one or many of your family members is one of the most profound and beautiful feelings that can be experienced, despite the severity of their loss. So don’t feel sorry for yourself, and instead honor the feelings of sadness that your experience will bring to you.

It is not your body that is experiencing physical pain with the craniotomy, it is your soul. It is the pain of knowing you have lost your precious loved one, who is still alive as you walk to the hospital and sit in what will most likely be the last hospital bed in your life. In some ways, the feeling of knowing that you have lost one or many of your family members is one of the most profound and beautiful feelings that can be experienced, despite the severity of their loss. So don’t feel sorry for yourself, and instead honor the feelings of sadness that your experience will bring to you. You are just as beautiful in the morning after the surgery as you were before. That is how a craniotomy is actually a good thing, as it helps the brain reestablish homeostasis, and in some ways it restores your balance and health.

That is how a craniotomy is actually a good thing, as it helps the brain reestablish homeostasis, and in some ways it restores your balance and health. Accept your experience.