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Wellness

How To Change Fads And Habits, Without Losing The Value You Added To Your Life

For the past 18 months, Oprah Winfrey has been taking a new approach to helping thousands of her fans through “The Art of Charm.” Through The Art of Charm, she teaches viewers to embrace their flaws, but she also shares practical, life-shaping strategies as well, based on her most popular television programs.

For the past 18 months, Oprah Winfrey has been taking a new approach to helping thousands of her fans through “The Art of Charm.” Through “The Art of Charm,” she teaches viewers to embrace their flaws, but she also shares practical, life-shaping strategies as well, based on her most popular television programs. We all do it — we’re not always smart, but sometimes we just do. You’re not as bad as you think, and you can be good for your family. The question is, how can you help your loved ones understand? It’s so simple; just do it. No excuses, no lies, it’s real easy.

In a recent episode of the show, “Oprah: Where Are They Now,” Oprah told her audience about how, many years ago, she made a mistake in one of her programs that led to what she called, “The Blackout.” You can see her explaining it in the video player below:

When a producer for “Oprah: Where Are They Now” saw that Oprah was on the verge of a panic attack, he decided to make a call. “What’s going on?”, the producer asked. Oprah responded, “My son came home from school crying because he had to call his father and talk about a boy in his class who said he knew he’d get a hug from me anytime he’d be sad, and he didn’t have a hug. And I think, I can be the best mother I want to be, but that didn’t make me feel good about myself. I wasn’t comfortable with that in my heart.” The producer looked back at her and said, “You have a lot to teach your son about life.” Oprah smiled and answered, “I’ll be learning a lesson every day at home, whether I’m hugging or crying. I will try to make sure that I have a healthy self-esteem, because, you know, I know who I am, and it’s not going to be that good for other people to see who I am, and who I’ve been, on my show.”

Here’s an excerpt from the segment that you may or may not have seen on Oprah’s TV show. It is a perfect example of someone accepting and embracing their mistake:

Oprah: This was a huge mistake — I just couldn’t believe it. When I went into the studio afterwards, my husband — he goes, “Why did you go to show the producers? I thought you were going to cry.” Oprah: My children, my kids don’t understand — they’ve never seen me cry. It’s really hard. My kids ask, “Why do you cry sometimes?” I just don’t know how to answer them. So, to me, it was like coming to the end of a cycle. I’d done so much damage to myself, and now I needed help. I needed to learn how to heal.

In Oprah’s book, “A Body Called Your Own”, a passage that she refers to in the video clip above is an example of the powerful words that she uses to help her audience accept and embrace their mistakes, no matter how trivial or embarrassing.

As a parent of two daughters, I want them to be happy. But I also understand that they grow up with their father, and it’s difficult to do parenting aloneā€¦ My daughter is learning how to be a single parent, or a second parent, a full-time parent. She needs me, but I need her. I need her to see what a wonderful Mom I am, but she needs me to see what wonderful, wonderful mom I am. And if it feels uncomfortable at times, I need to know that I have her back. That’s hard to do as a single mother — I’m learning how to love my daughter on my own.