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Wellness

How To Find Happiness While Working On Your Career

Our careers come in so many shapes and sizes that finding the ideal path can be hard. Finding your personal, emotional and professional happiness at work is easier than ever before. You have the tools to be fulfilled. Just follow these 7 steps.

I remember the first time I really came across the concept of “happiness,” specifically, one specific sort of happiness. I was sitting in my friend’s office and suddenly came across a document that read simply, “Do what is most meaningful to you.” That sentence was something I had spent more hours looking for than anything else during my life but had never found. I’ve read it at least twenty times since. It has been at the center of my personal and professional pursuits for nearly two decades and still is so. It helped me to be successful in my career, to be happy at work, to be happy to do my job. I’ll be writing further on this in my forthcoming book, Happiness at Work. But the idea is worth the effort, because this one simple formula is the key to unlocking happiness at work.

A few weeks ago, I discovered a book called The Happiness Project

by Tim Ferriss and Tony Robbins. They are the brainy guys who write the gurus of productivity, making their tips and tricks available for download for people to borrow. They made the concept of “personal happiness” accessible to the masses with this book. I’ve read it three times and it is a phenomenal read for anyone who wants to find their own inner “happiness.” For example, in Chapter 4 of the book, Ferriss writes, “When you’re unhappy you know something is wrong with you and yet you’re determined to avoid change. The longer you keep going in this position, the more likely you are to find yourself in the same dilemma, but instead of being able to face the facts, you’ll fight the inevitable. Your brain, which has been given an ever-increasing challenge, simply goes into denial: It tells you to stay unhappy. But you’re not unhappy; you’re in denial.”

“The good news is, your subconscious is the smartest thing working in the background of your mind and it is constantly challenging you to accept your reality.” — Tim Ferriss

We’re so used to our jobs being our “happiest” times that we get anxious about finding that happy place, even when things in our lives are going well.

In the book, Tim Ferriss explains the subconscious “happiness” that occurs when we aren’t focused on our jobs as being our greatest source of happiness even in the midst of our worst times of trouble as a human being.

We might not have an exit plan if things go bad during our workday, and it is a part of our subconscious that is always ready to help us move on if necessary.

A few weeks ago I came across a blog post from John Heinis, who is a psychologist at Brown. It was an insightful post called Happiness in your Head: How to Build Mental Toughness, Build Mental Health and Find Joy in Difficult Times. Heinis writes, “If you have problems with unhappiness, whether it’s your work or family life or your relationship with yourself, it could well be your imagination that has gotten out of hand. When your imagination gets out of control, it has a way of generating problems for both yourself and others—sometimes in ways you don’t even want.”

Heineris goes on to explain that some of the most common causes of unhappiness in the workplace are these:

Unstable finances : We spend too much money on food we don’t actually need.

: We spend too much money on food we don’t actually need. Distractions : We’re addicted to our phones and emails and other devices that are keeping us up at night, distracting us from work.

: We’re addicted to our phones and emails and other devices that are keeping us up at night, distracting us from work. Loneliness : We spend too much time alone during the day or have too many negative people in our lives.

: We spend too much time alone during the day or have too many negative people in our lives.