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Wellness

How To Get The Best Of Both Worlds: Exercise And Sleep

The best time to exercise is the time your body is most taxed. The best time to sleep is during your most rested state — in other words, the moments where you’re ready to wake up and feel good. Sleep, in combination with exercise and good nutrition, has become as important as the work itself when you want to feel good and perform at a high level. Exercise is a lifestyle choice just as much as diet — just don’t be afraid to choose it and stick to it. Sleep, on the other hand, isn’t for everyone. But if you can’t sleep better, then at least find the right balance, and make it work for you.

Most athletes find that they are able to lose the weight they’ve put on because they get plenty of sleep and work out at the right times. For those who are trying to maintain the same weight or just to keep their weight down, there’s another solution: a better sleeping schedule. Sleep, in combination with exercise and good nutrition, has become as important as the work itself when you want to feel good and perform at a high level. Sleep, in combination with exercise and good nutrition, has become as important as the work itself when you want to feel good and perform at a high level. Sleep has given me my path and my purpose.

My sleep routine is not always easy to maintain and involves a number of modifications — some permanent, some not — but over time, it does seem to be working for me. Sleep, in combination with exercise and good nutrition, has become as important as the work itself when you want to feel good and perform at a high level. Sleep has given me my path and my purpose.

In addition to the work that goes into sleeping well all over the day, the first few weeks of my routine have me waking up a bit earlier. This may be for the best, since I feel much better before having to struggle with the second round of cramps. While this may sound crazy, I’ll explain it in greater detail later.

I’ve heard that exercising too hard can actually disrupt regular sleep. This is actually false.   When I exercise, I know that I will do a certain amount of it, and then it becomes easier until I reach my goals (which is about 60-70 minutes.) This is called the “steady state.” When you’re in a plateau, you find it hard to keep pushing yourself beyond your comfort zone since you’re tired and unable to focus as you go. One thing I’ve found over the past few weeks is that by starting to exercise a bit earlier, and doing a little bit at a time, it almost seems to get easier the longer I do it. This makes it that little bit easier to see my goals, and then make progress toward them as time goes on. I am not yet at the point where I can push my workouts into my bed. I’ve got to push it a bit further than that.

I started exercising and sleeping better at the same time. During the first week of exercising, I got up between 6 and 6:30 in the morning (usually between 6 and 7).   The next week I was up at 6:30, which worked well enough. I kept it up through my early weekends, until I made a shift in the middle of the week to go to bed much earlier. By the middle of the week I was up at 6:45, and by the end of the week I was up by 10:45. Before the change I would wake up between 6 and 6:30 in the morning every day, but now I wake up earlier at night.   I’ve seen more change after switching to this schedule, but it’s hard to say if I truly saw significant improvements over the course of the week.   So many things change in the middle of the week, and I would not take it as definitive that this was one of them.

I have, on a number of occasions, found myself needing to take a quick nap before I work out, which may be the best time to nap for me. If you find yourself in that odd situation where you’re either exhausted or feel that you need to take a quick nap, you may want to try it.   Not everyone agrees with this, of course, but in my opinion it has led to better recovery.

This week, I did an exercise with two legs.