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Wellness

Why You’re Overwhelmed By All The Stuff In The World

If you want to make your life better, you’ve got to become more mindful of what’s going on in the world. A little more insight, a little more gratitude and appreciation and compassion can add up to a profound change. So, if you want to change the world, just start noticing it a little more — let go of your expectations and your gripes, and let your senses take them wherever they want to go.

You can’t know everything, but you can know enough to change the world. Your life is unique and should be treated as such. To find what is right for you, you have to look beyond the surface. If you don’t start out with this in mind, you will get lost in the minutiae of the day to day and miss the big picture. You want happiness, not misery, so learn what happiness is. Learn what the Buddha talked about. That’s what I call meditation. It’s when you don’t get lost in the minutiae of your life, but get lost in the bigger picture of your life so that the minutiae becomes less important to you. And then when you can sit and be in the moment and truly notice what’s going on, you can begin to become more mindful of what’s going on with you in the world.

If you’re not happy, you’re not practicing.

If you’re not practicing, you’re just letting your thoughts run on and off.

You’re thinking, “I’m so happy these thoughts keep me going.” And these thoughts will continue to run on and off for the rest of your life. “I’m overjoyed when that thought keeps happening in my head.” If that happens constantly, you’re practicing a pattern of thinking that you’re never able to let go of. If you’re going to learn to learn in mindfulness, this is the first step — to learn to be content.

For a more detailed description, download my free 6-part ebook,  Meditation for the Real World. This is the book that opened my eyes to the fact that I was missing a key ingredient to my happiness. I had thought a lot about mindfulness, and I thought I had a good understanding of it. But I didn’t understand what it really meant, and what it really took to be happy. I had to know about this magic ingredient to happiness, and I didn’t know what the magic ingredient was — so you don’t either. Meditation for the Real World puts together the key ingredients for your happiness, together with my experience in applying them. If you want to know what it takes to be truly happy, learn what the Buddha taught, and apply that knowledge to the rest of your life. What is mindfulness? “Mindfulness” is a word that was coined by the Japanese Zen master, Roshi, in the 1950’s. However, most people don’t know what that term means in relation to the world beyond their comfort zone. “Mindfulness” means being aware of, observing what’s going on in your life. That is, being aware of what’s going on in the world, not just within your body. The second part of “mindfulness” is “breathing.” For most people, breathing is a regular, continuous thing. Breathing becomes a part of our everyday life, but most people don’t understand why we should take that approach to breathing. “What we do with our breaths has real effects on the way we feel.” It doesn’t have to be that way. Some of the best studies in mindfulness and breathing have been done by Dr. Paul Ekman who is a professor of developmental and human behavior at the University of Wisconsin. He spent decades studying and researching the connection between how we breathe and how we feel. In his experiments with people, he found that we can manipulate how our breathing feels and experience through practice. He describes this as a three-way connection — in which the actions we take have a direct effect on the body and brain, but our mind knows that a conscious, thought-out thought has to be there to make it happen.

The three actions that Ekman identified were: 1. Sitting. 2. Knees together. 3. Eyes closed. Each of these actions has a direct effect on your breathing and how you feel. When you become aware of your breathing, you are practicing the first part of “breathing,” which was Ekman’s first step.